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20131202
20131210
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offer access to everything from education to health care to a safe shelter from the streets, which means that your harnessing the power of community to expand opportunity for folks here in dc. and your work reflects a tradition that runs through our h history, the belief that we're greater together than we are on our own. and that's what i have come here to talk about today. over the last two months washington has been dominated by some fairly contention debates, and between a reckless shoutdown by congressional republicans, and admittedly poor execution on my administration's part in implementing the latest stage of the new law, nobody has acquitted themselves very well these last few months, so it's not surprising that the american's people's frustrations with washington are at an all-time high. but we know the people's frustrations run deeper than these most recent political battles. the frustration is rooted in their own daily battles. to make ends meet, pay for college, buy a home, save for retirement. it's rooted in the nagging sense that no matter how hard they work the deck is st
. all of the money, all of the education, all of the business opportunity went to a very very small minority, and if you want to equal that out, it is going to cost, and it is going to hurt. all of those school children that left to protest, and then you saw the massacre. they shot children in the back. those children gave up their education, and it works. it was that global pressure to end apartheid, that led to it. and those very children wanted jobs in the new south africa. and they couldn't get them, because in the end, it was now -- it is now about education. so that's the problem that south africa had. they had brought them to the promise land. that's what with the country still sufficient errs from. >> 76. >> right. >> and remember at the time, the world was getting onboard with the let's do something about south africa, but the problems with ever this the wrights and great britain. ronald ragan and margaret thatcher were really the most resistence to imposing sanctions. we're saying to the president at the time, we have to do something. >> and they wouldn't. >> yes. >> and t
there are five things we can do to fix education in america >> the united states has education apartheid, that's the facts... >> talk to al jazeera with m. night shayamalan sunday at 7et / 4pt on al jazeera america >> this is "inside story." i'm ray suarez. we have rick seany with fair compare compare, and douglas kidd, and terry trip letter, an aviation analyst who runs a consumer website called "the plane rules." you heard terry trip letter laying out the ways that this could be good for all the stake hold efforts involved, but we have lived through an era of mega mergers. have they done any of the things that terry suggests? >> i'm not sure that they have. the primary benefit that all these mergers have provided is that they've kept carriers in business while they have consolidated. while the carriers are in business, we want them to make money and provide good service there has been to my mind especially among the u.s. carriers a focus more on making money rather than pleasing the passenger . in this with regard we know going to the airport is like going to a carnival where you pay your fe
education. >> ...surprising >> oh, absolutely! >> ...exclusive one-on-one interviews with the most interesting people of our time. >> you're listening because you want to see what's going to happen. >> i want to know what works what do you know works? >> conversations you won't find anywhere else. >> talk to al jazeera. >> only on al jazeera america. >> oh my! >> welcome back to inside story. i'm ray suarez. we're talking about congress and the to do list this week before it adjourns for the year. we're continuing our conversation with ginger gibson, and dan glickman, and josh withrow. and mr. secretary, as a legislator, you crafted and voted on bills. as a secretary you had people looking over cure shoulder at one of the largest branch departments and then you had business before the congress. had a have you seen in the way that the work is getting done over your career in washington? >> it's certainly slowed down considerably. a lot of stop lights these days. you used to be on a freeway of legislative action. they didn't stop and lurch as much as they do now. a part of this is be
because i'm sure you've heard stories o like ms. ward. college educated, 500, 1,000, 1500 job applications. what is going on in the economy? >> i think its more serious than the economy. employers own the long-term unemployment, and the what has d is the employment infrastructure, the methods, the tools that employers use to recruit and hire people. where in the past if you want to find a job you had to be able to walk into a job interview, demonstrate to an interhands down that you could do the work. if it was management, mechanical, weather. you had to demonstrate that you can do it profitbly for the employer. what has changed dramatically not what needs to be done to recruit and hire. what has changed is that employers are working on a dum dumbed-down system of databases and key words. rather than having intelligent discussion that allows the person to show you how they're going profit their business, employers are matching key words in the date abou database to ken resumÉs. they. >> peter, this up ends everything that we hear about how labor markets work. you need people to do tasks i
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5